The Universe

where all good people live

awkward-lee:

image

that escalated quickly 

(via itsgayerinenochian)

bigdickgrier:

menduhs:

forever-cheeky:

THIS IS MY FAVOURITE GIF EVER

I will never not reblog this omg

the notes on this holy shit

(via itsgayerinenochian)

kakaphoe:

rossthenerd:

Some of the many funny Batman and Alfred moments over the years. BROTP.

The older I get the more I appreciate Alfred.

(via itsgayerinenochian)

allthingseurope:

Bibury, England (by jeremy..)

mediumaevum:

Medieval Graffiti - not so rare after all

A project to record the graffiti, which began in Norfolk, has now been rolled out to other areas and is gradually spreading across England.

Armed with just a torch and a camera, a team of volunteers have recorded more than 28,000 images from churches in Norfolk alone and are a third of the way through searching Norwich Cathedral, where there are many more examples. Read on

ancientcoins:

This, believe it or not, is a coin. It’s a coin of the polis of Olbia on the black sea coast, and it is a cast in the shape of a dolphin. In one of the most remarkable currencies of the ancient world, Olbia, literally the wealthy city, according to its name, chose to mint coins in a non-circular form for the first time since the invention of coins. The distinct form is generally attributed to the fact that the city of Olbia, located on the Black Sea, was at the fringes of the Greek world, therefore adapted Greek forms to fit their own needs. The large quantities of finds and the later appearance of dolphins on circular coins have convinced scholars that these were used in exchange.
The symbolism of the dolphin is believed to be religious, since the city held a large temple to Apollo Delphinios, Apollo of the Dolphins, which is also connected to the Apollo at Delphi. The image shown here, taken from a Greek vase, shows Apollo atop a tripod with his lyre, accompanied by dolphins.

The coins are undated through any kind of marking but are generally thought to be the product of the 5th or 4th centuries BCE. They are bronze and are generally a little more than an inch long.

ancientcoins:

This, believe it or not, is a coin. It’s a coin of the polis of Olbia on the black sea coast, and it is a cast in the shape of a dolphin. In one of the most remarkable currencies of the ancient world, Olbia, literally the wealthy city, according to its name, chose to mint coins in a non-circular form for the first time since the invention of coins. The distinct form is generally attributed to the fact that the city of Olbia, located on the Black Sea, was at the fringes of the Greek world, therefore adapted Greek forms to fit their own needs. The large quantities of finds and the later appearance of dolphins on circular coins have convinced scholars that these were used in exchange.

The symbolism of the dolphin is believed to be religious, since the city held a large temple to Apollo Delphinios, Apollo of the Dolphins, which is also connected to the Apollo at Delphi. The image shown here, taken from a Greek vase, shows Apollo atop a tripod with his lyre, accompanied by dolphins.

image

The coins are undated through any kind of marking but are generally thought to be the product of the 5th or 4th centuries BCE. They are bronze and are generally a little more than an inch long.

(via classicsenthusiast)

mini-girlz:

Two Dancers

Terracotta

Early 3rd BCE

Tanagra, Boeotia, Greece

Height 17.7 cm CA 588 

via > lessingimages.com

(via timeywriter)

kawaii-desu-loki-chan:

I had back surgery recently and haven’t been in my room almost an entire month, and I just walked for the first time and I find this waiting for me.

Thor, what are you doing!?

(via mangaka-soldier)